Rhythm and Pattern

Rythym

  Repetition is a necessary ingredient to rhythm by doesn’t guarantee a sense of rhythm alone.   Sense of musical rhythm needs to also be apparent. Rhythm can be boring but can be used to give the eye time to travel across the frame to a point of interest. (Freeman,M.2007:49)

 

Gestalt law of continuation seems to plays a large part in the success of an image.

Examples of Rythm

– Gettleman, J. (2013). The Price of Precious. National Geographic. 125th anniversary edition (0), 51- 53.   Photographs by: Marcus Bleasdale

 In this National Geographic article Marcus Bleasdale has presented a very powerful set of images depicting the exploitation and hardship of gold miners in Democratic Republic of Congo.  On page 46 is a line of miners panning in a river and this composition of the line of men could almost be musical notes lifted from sheet music. The eye is taken from left to right scanning the scene but comes to rest on the front of the frame where the strongest detail of the work being undertaken is situated.

 

-George Steinmetz. (2013). Celebrate. National Geographic. 125th anniversary edition (1), 119. Photograph by: Simon Norfolk. Uxmal, Mexico.

This image is an architectural image of a Mayan ruin built in the Classic Period.  This image is where rhythm could be boring as Michael Freeman described (Freeman,M.2007:49) However, the law of continuation is punctuated by shafts of light that lifts the composition into a pleasing one.

 Pattern.

 ….is associated with area and not direction as rhythm is.  The eye scans the entire image. The greater the number of ‘items’ present, the greater the sense of pattern. (Freeman,M.2007:49)

 

Examples of pattern.

 – Gettleman, J. (2013). The Price of Precious. National Geographic. 125th anniversary edition (0), 51 53.   Photographs by: Marcus Bleasdale

 On page 43 is another image from the Congo mining series.  Here a sodden and precarious bank of clay mud is broken up by intermittent workingmen woven together by lines of ‘pathways’.  The eye is taken in different direction by means of these paths from left to right. The implied lines takes our eyes from top to bottom and diagonally each way.

 – Byrne, D.  Images of Far East – Parasols. Available: http://www.dominicbyrne.com/photo_3742666.html. Last accessed 20th November 2013. 

 Photographer: Dominic Byrne ARPS (Finalist Landscape Photographer of the year 2013)

 This image of Parasols is a classic example of how pleasing pattern can be in terms of colour and texture.  The pattern of the parasols fills the frame with the ribs fanning out leading the eye in different directions.

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